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Ampleforth

Ragged Heroes
Rise Up Like The Sun
Songs Of Hope
Tunes Of Glory
Half-Remembered Albion Hymns
A Country Scrap Book
This Green & Pleasant Land
This Albion Village
Another Albion Daughter
Literary Heritage
Will I See Thee More
Lost Empires
Everyday Films
Ampleforth
Ampleforth/Lay Me Low
The Gresford Disaster
Fairport Un-Convention-al
Angel Delight
John "Babbacombe" Lee
Band Of Hope
Georgia On Our Minds
Ralph Vaughan Williams.
Musical Traditions
Adventures In The Tradition
Poor Old Horse
Son Of Morris On
The Transports
The Transports II
Ragged Links

Ampleforth

The Cloister In The World

 A View of Ampleforth Abbey Looking East.
Ampleforth Abbey

We can, perhaps, begin our tour of this beautiful place, by quoting some brief history of Ampleforth, courtesy of the English website of the Benedictine Order, of which, Ampleforth is one of their houses.
On 21st November 1607 Dom Sigebert Buckley, last surviving monk of the Westminster community revived by Queen Mary, aggregated Robert Sadler
and Edward Mayhew, English monks of the Cassinese Congregation, to the Abbey of Westminster and the ancient English Congregation. Fr Edward Mayhew went to St Lawrences, Dieulouard in France in 1613.
Monastic life began at St Lawrences in 1608 with a handful of exiled Englishmen, and for the next 185 years men were trained for the English mission. Dom Alban Roe, a monk of St Lawrences was executed as a priest at Tyburn in London in 1642, and was canonised by Pope Paul VI in 1970.
Driven from France at the outbreak of the Revolution in 1792, St Lawrences were on the move in England, mainly in Lancashire, for ten years, before finally settling at Ampleforth in 1802. The first church was completed in 1857, being pulled down in 1957 to make way for the completion of the current Abbey Church, begun in 1924 and consecrated in 1961. The school attached to the Abbey began its life the following year. St Benets Hall, a permanent private hall of the University of Oxford, was founded in 1897 and serves as a house of studies for the Congregation and for other religious and laymen. In 1955 a foundation was made at St Louis, Missouri, USA which became independent in 1973 and an abbey in 1989. In 1996 the community made a new foundation at Macheke in Zimbabwe.

As well as working in the school at Ampleforth a third of the community is also involved in parochial work in the north of England.

To the right you will also find links to other Benedictine house within England.

The Abbey of Ampleforth

Ampleforth Abbey: looking west after a snowfall

Ampleforth, located in the county of Yorkshire, England, belongs to the English Congregation of Benedictines and has a lineal continuity with the pre-Reformation abbey of Westminster through Father Sebert Buckley, last surviving monk of that community. The present abbey was founded in a house given to Father Anselm Bolton by Lady Anne Fairfax. This house was taken over by Dr. Brewer, President of the Congregation, 30 July, 1802. The community, since leaving Dieulouard in Lorraine, where its members had joined with Spanish and Cassinese Benedictines to form the monastery of St. Lawrence, had been successively at Acton Burnell, Tranmere, Scholes, Vernon Hall, and Parbold Hall, under its superior Dr. Marsh. On its migration to Ampleforth Lodge, Dr. Marsh remained at Parbold and Father Appleton was elected the first prior of the new monastery. Shortly afterwards Parbold was broken up and the boys of the school there transferred to Ampleforth. The priory was erected into an abbey, in 1890, by the Bull "Diuquidem"; and has an important and flourishing college attached to it. The Bishop of Newport, Dr. Hedley, is one of the most distinguished of its alumni, as well as its present superior, Abbot Smith. The monastery was finished in 1897. "It is", says Almond "a tall, spacious building of four stories and a basement, joined to the old monastery by a cloister. It is of grat architectural beauty. The whole of the basement is taken up by the monastic library, consisting of some 30,00 columes, many of them of extreme rarity. The refectory, lecture halls, and the abbot's rooms are on the first floor; above are the cells of the monks, forty-eight in all. The pulic rooms are on the scale of the larger abbeys of pre-Reformation times". According to the English "Catholic Directory" for 1906, there are fifteen priests in the abbey; but there are a number of dependent missions served by monks of the community. The titular abbacies of Westminster and York and the Cathedral priories of Durham, Worcester, Chester, and Rochester are attached to the abbey.
 
courtesy of the Catholic Encyclopedia

The Choir with flowers

This new large-format book, shown below, with a link to the page, where you can purchase it, if you wish, celebrates the second centenary of the monastery and school at Ampleforth. It has a large number of illustrations (half the book is printed in colour) and many impressions and stories of individuals and events.

A School of the Lords Service

The Ampleforth webpages created and owned by

Ampleforth Abbey Trustees. Copyright 2001.

Registered Charity No.1026493.
Postal address: Ampleforth Abbey, York, YO62 4EN.
email contact:
webmonk@ampleforth.org.uk

ampleforth_abbey.jpg

With voice divine

With voice divine
Soloists of
Ampleforth College
 
track listing
 
Bain, arr. Jacob -
Brother James Air
 
 
Handel - O lovely peace
(Judas Maccabaeus)
 
 
Vaughan Williams - Linden Lea
 
 
Handel - Art thou troubled?
(Roselinda)
 
 
Ford - Come, Phyllis,
come into these bowers  
 
 
Dowland - Fine knacks for ladies
 
 
Purcell - Fairest Isle
(King Arthur)
 
 
Handel - With pious hearts
(Judas Maccabaeus)
 
 
Bach - Fugue in E Flat
(St Anne) BWV 552
 
 
Schubert - Was ist Sylvia
 
 
Schumann - Three songs
 (Dichterliebe)
 
Quilter - Go lovely rose
 
 
Head - The little road to Bethlehem
 
 
Warlock - Captain Strattons Fancy
 
 
Nares - In the sight of the unwise
 
 
Faure - Ave Maria
 
 
Franck - Panis Angelicus
 
 
soloists
 
James Arthur (8, 11, 12, 13, 16)
Christopher Borrett (18)
Daniel Cuccio (19)
Benedict Dollard (1, 2, 20)
William Dollard (1, 2, 20)
Paul French (7, 10, 14)
Rory Mulchrone (3, 4)
David Pearce (5, 6, 15, 17)
Tristan Russcher (9)
 
accompanist:
Simon Wright

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